Are you making bad hiring decisions?

If you hire people because you like them, you make bad hiring decisions.

What if I told you the #1 mistake hiring managers make in an interview is hiring someone they like? I bet you'd say I was crazy.

Yes, that's likely true. But maybe I'm crazy like a fox!

You see, too often in interviews, we allow extraneous factors to influence our decisions. More often than not, those things are connected to our personal biases and preferences -- and are not inherent in the candidates we are interviewing.

OUR DECISIONS SAY MORE ABOUT US THAN THEM

Often the decisions we make about candidates and the opinions we form about them -- where they grew up, the school they went to, the clothes they choose to wear, the words they use, the way they formated their resume -- say more about us than it does about them.

Furthermore, the assumptions we make about candidates are not fixed, nor are they objective. They vary from interviewer to interviewer. Two people can look at the same resume, participate in the same interview, receive the same thank you note. Still, one person's assessment of confidence can be interpreted by another as arrogance.

A FIRST IMPRESSION IS A LOUSY MARKER OF SKILLS

Many of us grew up with the old axiom about the importance of first impressions. Not just that first impressions are lasting, but first impressions are high stakes: "You only have one chance to make a good first impression." Yikes!

Indeed, according to a